Christ Our Hope In Life And Death

What is our hope in life and death?
Christ alone, Christ alone.
What is our only confidence?
That our souls to Him belong.

Who holds our days within His hand?
What comes, apart from His command?
And what will keep us to the end?
The love of Christ, in which we stand.

O sing hallelujah!
Our hope springs eternal;
O sing hallelujah!
Now and ever we confess
Christ our hope in life and death.

What truth can calm the troubled soul?
God is good, God is good.
Where is His grace and goodness known?
In our great Redeemer’s blood.

Who holds our faith when fears arise?
Who stands above the stormy trial?
Who sends the waves that bring us nigh
Unto the shore, the rock of Christ?

O sing hallelujah!
Our hope springs eternal;
O sing hallelujah!
Now and ever we confess
Christ our hope in life and death.

Unto the grave, what shall we sing?
“Christ, He lives; Christ, He lives!”
And what reward will heaven bring?
Everlasting life with Him.

There we will rise to meet the Lord,
Then sin and death will be destroyed,
And we will feast in endless joy,
When Christ is ours forevermore.

O sing hallelujah!
Our hope springs eternal;
O sing hallelujah!
Now and ever we confess
Christ our hope in life and death.

—Words and Music by Keith Getty, Matt Boswell, Jordan Kauflin, Matt Merker, Matt Papa ©2020 Getty Music Publishing / Messenger Hymns / Jordan Kauflin Music / Matthew Merker Music / Getty Music Hymns and Songs / Love Your Enemies Publishing / adm at MusicServices.org — CCLI # 7147502

See The Destined Day Arise

See the destined day arise!
See a willing sacrifice!
Jesus, to redeem our loss,
Hangs upon the shameful cross;
Jesus, who but You could bear
Wrath so great and justice fair,
Every pang and bitter throe,
Finishing Your life of woe?

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Lamb of God for sinners slain!
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Jesus Christ, we praise Your name!

Who but Christ had dared to drain,
Steeped in gall, the cup of pain,
And with tender body bear
Thorns and nails and piercing spear?
Slain for us, the water flowed,
Mingled from Your side with blood;
Sign to all attesting eyes
Of the finished sacrifice.

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Lamb of God for sinners slain!
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Jesus Christ, we praise Your name!

Holy Jesus, grant us grace
In that sacrifice to place
All our trust for life renewed,
Pardoned sin, and promised good.
Grant us grace to sing Your praise
‘Round Your throne through endless days,
Ever with the sons of light,
“Blessing, honor, glory, might!”

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Lamb of God for sinners slain!
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Jesus Christ, we praise Your name!

—Original words by Venantius Fortunatus, tr. Richard Mant, Public Domain
Alt. words, chorus, and music: Matthew Merker ©2014 Matthew Merker Music / Sovereign Grace Praise

Abide With Me

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;
The darkness deepens; Lord, with me abide;
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, oh, abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;
Earth’s joys grow dim, its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see—
O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour;
What but Thy grace can foil the tempter’s pow’r?
Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness;
Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;
Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies;
Heav’n’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;
In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

—Words by Henry F. Lyte. Music by William H. Monk

All Glory Be To Christ

Should nothing of our efforts stand,
No legacy survive
Unless the Lord does raise the house
In vain its builders strive

To you who boast tomorrow’s gain
Tell me what is your life
A mist that vanishes at dawn,
All glory be to Christ

All glory be to Christ our King,
All glory be to Christ
His rule and reign we’ll ever sing,
All glory be to Christ

His will be done,
His kingdom come,
On earth as is above
Who is Himself our daily bread
Praise Him the Lord of love

Let living water satisfy
The thirsty without price
We’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
All glory be to Christ

All glory be to Christ our King,
All glory be to Christ
His rule and reign we’ll ever sing,
All glory be to Christ

When on that day the Great I am,
The faithful and the true
The Lamb who was for sinners slain
Is making all things new

Behold our God shall live with us
And be our steadfast light
And we shall e’re His people be,
All glory be to Christ

All glory be to Christ our King,
All glory be to Christ
His rule and reign we’ll ever sing,
All glory be to Christ

—Words: Dustin Kensrue. Music: Auld Lang Syne – Scottish traditional.
© 2012 We Are Younger We Are Faster / Dead Bird Theology
CCLI Song # 7008232

Lord Have Mercy (For What We Have Done)

For what we have done and left undone
We fall on Your countless mercies
For sins that are known and those unknown
We call on Your name so holy
For envy and pride, for closing our eyes
For scorning our very neighbor
In thought word and deed we’ve failed You our King
How deeply we need a Savior

Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us
Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us

For what You have done Your life of love
You perfectly lived we praise You
Though tempted and tried You fixed Your eyes
You finished the work God gave You
And there on the tree A King among thieves
You bled for a world’s betrayal
You loved to the end Our merciful friend
How pure and forever faithful

Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us
Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us

For hearts that are cold for seizing control
For scorning our very Maker
In thought word and deed we’ve failed You our King
How deeply we need a Savior

Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us
Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us
Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us
Lord have mercy Christ have mercy
Lord have mercy on us

—Matt Boswell, Matt Papa, Aaron Keys, and James Tealy
©2019 Getty Music Hymns and Songs / Love Your Enemies Publishing /
Getty Music Publishing / Messenger Hymns / My Eleiht Songs /
Adm. by MusicServices.org / Common Hymnal Publishing / 10000 Fathers /
Adm. at CapitolCMGPublishing.com

My Savior’s Love (What Tongue Could Tell)

What tongue could tell my Savior’s love
What song of angels could describe
Could endless praises be enough
To echo full His sacrifice
How worthy is the Lamb of God
Beyond all might or skill of pen
Still we confess and strain towards
Such mystery and magnificence

My Savior’s love
My Savior’s love
What could compare
What tongue could tell my Savior’s love

What tune could carry on its wings
The beauty of that final breath
What words dare paint the awesome scene
When God stood in the stead of man
When Jesus Christ the radiant One
Took on the shadows of our hate
Then rose again just as the sun
With light and power in fullest grace

My Savior’s love
My Savior’s love
What could compare
What tongue could tell my Savior’s love

And when in death this tongue is stilled
My song of life has reached the end
Though as a flower I may wilt
This everlasting truth will stand
No death or life could separate
Me from the love of Christ my Lord
This hope is sure from age to age

My Savior’s love
My Savior’s love
What could compare
What tongue could tell my Savior’s love

—Matt Boswell, Matt Papa, Keith Getty
©2019 Getty Music Publishing / Messenger Hymns / Getty Music Hymns
and Songs / Love Your Enemies Publishing / Adm by MusicServices.org

Lord From Sorrows Deep I Call (Psalm 42)

Lord, from sorrows deep I call
When my hope is shaken
Torn and ruined from the fall
Hear my desperation
For so long I’ve pled and prayed
God, come to my rescue
Even so the thorn remains
Still my heart will praise You

Storms within my troubled soul
Questions without answers
On my faith these billows roll
God, be now my shelter
Why are you cast down my soul?
Hope in Him who saves you
When the fires have all grown cold
Cause this heart to praise You

And, oh, my soul, put your hope in God
My help, my Rock, I will praise Him
Sing, oh, sing through the raging storm
You’re still my God, my salvation

Should my life be torn from me
Every worldly pleasure
When all I possess is grief
God, be then my treasure
Be my vision in the night
Be my hope and refuge
Till my faith is turned to sight
Lord, my heart will praise You

And, oh, my soul, put your hope in God
My help, my Rock, I will praise Him
Sing, oh, sing through the raging storm
You’re still my God, my salvation

—Words and Music by Matt Papa and Matt Boswell
©2018 Getty Music Hymns and Songs / Love Your Enemies Publishing /
Getty Music Publishing / Messenger Hymns / Adm. by MusicServices.org

J.I. Packer On The Five Points

First, it should be observed that the “five points of Calvinism,” so-called, are simply the Calvinistic answer to a five-point manifesto (the Remonstrance) put out by certain “Belgic semi-Pelagians” in the early seventeenth century. The theology which it contained (known to history as Arminianism) stemmed from two philosophical principles: first, that divine sovereignty is not compatible with human freedom, nor therefore with human responsibility; second, that ability limits obligation. (The charge of semi-Pelagianism was thus fully justified.) From these principles, the Arminians drew two deductions: first that since the Bible regards faith as a free and responsible human act, it cannot be caused by God, but is exercised independently of Him; second, that since the Bible regards faith as obligatory on the part of all who hear the gospel, ability to believe must be universal. Hence, they maintained, Scripture must be interpreted as teaching the following positions: (1.) Man is never so completely corrupted by sin that he cannot savingly believe the gospel when it is put before him, nor (2.) is he ever so completely controlled by God that he cannot reject it. (3.) God’s election of those who shall be saved is prompted by His foreseeing that they will of their own accord believe. (4.) Christ’s death did not ensure the salvation of anyone, for it did not secure the gift of faith to anyone (there is no such gift); what it did was rather to create a possibility of salvation for everyone if they believe. (5.) It rests with believers to keep themselves in a state of grace by keeping up their faith; those who fail here fall away and are lost. Thus, Arminianism made man’s salvation depend ultimately on man himself, saving faith being viewed throughout as man’s own work and, because his own, not God’s in him.

The Synod of Dort was convened in 1618 to pronounce on this theology, and the “five points of Calvinism” represent its counter-affirmations. They stem from a very different principle—the biblical principle that “salvation is of the Lord”; and they may be summarized thus: (1.) Fallen man in his natural state lacks all power to believe the gospel, just as he lacks all power to believe the law, despite all external inducements that may be extended to him. (2.) God’s election is a free, sovereign, unconditional choice of sinners, as sinners, to be redeemed by Christ, given faith and brought to glory. (3.) The redeeming work of Christ had as its end and goal the salvation of the elect. (4.) The work of the Holy Spirit in bringing men to faith never fails to achieve its object. (5.) Believers are kept in faith and grace by the unconquerable power of God till they come to glory. These five points are conveniently denoted by the mnemonic TULIP: Total depravity, Unconditional election, Limited atonement, Irresistible grace, Preservation of the saints.

—J.I. Packer
Introductory Essay to John Owen’s Death of Death in the Death of Christ