J.I. Packer On The Five Points

First, it should be observed that the “five points of Calvinism,” so-called, are simply the Calvinistic answer to a five-point manifesto (the Remonstrance) put out by certain “Belgic semi-Pelagians” in the early seventeenth century. The theology which it contained (known to history as Arminianism) stemmed from two philosophical principles: first, that divine sovereignty is not compatible with human freedom, nor therefore with human responsibility; second, that ability limits obligation. (The charge of semi-Pelagianism was thus fully justified.) From these principles, the Arminians drew two deductions: first that since the Bible regards faith as a free and responsible human act, it cannot be caused by God, but is exercised independently of Him; second, that since the Bible regards faith as obligatory on the part of all who hear the gospel, ability to believe must be universal. Hence, they maintained, Scripture must be interpreted as teaching the following positions: (1.) Man is never so completely corrupted by sin that he cannot savingly believe the gospel when it is put before him, nor (2.) is he ever so completely controlled by God that he cannot reject it. (3.) God’s election of those who shall be saved is prompted by His foreseeing that they will of their own accord believe. (4.) Christ’s death did not ensure the salvation of anyone, for it did not secure the gift of faith to anyone (there is no such gift); what it did was rather to create a possibility of salvation for everyone if they believe. (5.) It rests with believers to keep themselves in a state of grace by keeping up their faith; those who fail here fall away and are lost. Thus, Arminianism made man’s salvation depend ultimately on man himself, saving faith being viewed throughout as man’s own work and, because his own, not God’s in him.

The Synod of Dort was convened in 1618 to pronounce on this theology, and the “five points of Calvinism” represent its counter-affirmations. They stem from a very different principle—the biblical principle that “salvation is of the Lord”; and they may be summarized thus: (1.) Fallen man in his natural state lacks all power to believe the gospel, just as he lacks all power to believe the law, despite all external inducements that may be extended to him. (2.) God’s election is a free, sovereign, unconditional choice of sinners, as sinners, to be redeemed by Christ, given faith and brought to glory. (3.) The redeeming work of Christ had as its end and goal the salvation of the elect. (4.) The work of the Holy Spirit in bringing men to faith never fails to achieve its object. (5.) Believers are kept in faith and grace by the unconquerable power of God till they come to glory. These five points are conveniently denoted by the mnemonic TULIP: Total depravity, Unconditional election, Limited atonement, Irresistible grace, Preservation of the saints.

—J.I. Packer
Introductory Essay to John Owen’s Death of Death in the Death of Christ

The Lord Is My Salvation

The grace of God has reached for me
And pulled me from the raging sea
And I am safe on this solid ground
The Lord is my salvation

I will not fear when darkness falls
His strength will help me scale these walls
I’ll see the dawn of the rising sun
The Lord is my salvation

Who is like the Lord our God?
Strong to save, faithful in love
My debt is paid and the vict’ry won
The Lord is my salvation

My hope is hidden in the Lord
He flow’rs each promise of His Word
When winter fades I know spring will come
The Lord is my salvation

In times of waiting, times of need
When I know loss, when I am weak
I know His grace will renew these days
The Lord is my salvation

Who is like the Lord our God?
Strong to save, faithful in love
My debt is paid and the vict’ry won
The Lord is my salvation

And when I reach my final day
He will not leave me in the grave
But I will rise,
He will call me home
The Lord is my salvation

Who is like the Lord our God?
Strong to save, faithful in love
My debt is paid and the vict’ry won
The Lord is my salvation

Glory be to God the Father
Glory be to God the Son
Glory be to God the Spirit
The Lord is our salvation

—Words and Music by Keith Getty, Kristyn Getty, Nathan Nockels, and Jonas Myrin
©2016 Getty Music Publishing / Sweater Weather Music / Capitol CMG Paragon / Son of the Lion

Christ The Sure And Steady Anchor

Christ, the sure and steady anchor in the fury of the storm
When the winds of doubt blow through me and my sails have all been torn.
In the suff’ring, in the sorrow, when my sinking hopes are few,
I will hold fast to the anchor; it shall never be removed.

Christ, the sure and steady anchor while the tempest rages on,
When temptation claims the battle and it seems the night has won;
Deeper still then goes the anchor though I justly stand accused;
I will hold fast to the anchor; it shall never be removed.

Christ, the sure and steady anchor through the floods of unbelief;
Hopeless somehow, O my soul, now lift your eyes to Calvary.
This, my ballast of assurance; see His love forever proved;
I will hold fast to the anchor; it shall never be removed.

Christ, the sure and steady anchor as we face the wave of death,
When these trials give way to glory, as we draw our final breath;
We will cross that great horizon, clouds behind and life secure,
And the calm will be the better for the storms that we endure.

Christ, the shore of our salvation, ever faithful, ever true;
We will hold fast to the anchor; it shall never be removed.

—Music and Words by Matt Boswell and Matt Papa
© 2015 Common Hymnal Publishing, 10000 Fathers, Love Your Enemies Publishing, Dayspring Publishing, LLC. CCLI #7045331